Log in to check your private messages
Essential Reading
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The EUCantina Forums Forum Index » The Mos Eisley Cantina View previous topic :: View next topic  
 PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 11:59 pm Reply with quote  
Message
  Dog-Poop_Walker
Master
Master

Joined: 28 Jan 2012
Posts: 896
Location: Official Med. Grove Troublemaker

Caedus_16 wrote:
First of all..."Moby ****" is just hilarious to me. Not the novel, but that particular way of listing it. Just baha.


lol I immediately noticed that too.

That should be called the 100 most overrated books of all time. But seriously, the Davinci Code? The book isn't awful so much as it's just fluffy book of the week material that doesn't shine in anyway other than the controversy of it's subject matter for those who are ignorant to the fact that it's a ripped off idea that was nothing new the first time a major book was written about it. To be on the same list as the bible and the works of Shakespeare is insulting.

C16: May I ask why you picked the Plague out of Camus' catalogue?
_________________
They have taken the hearts and minds of our leaders. They have recruited the rich and the powerful, and they have blinded us to the truth! Our human spirit is corrupted. Why do we worship greed? Because, outside the limit of our sight, feeding off us, perched on top of us from birth to death are OUR OWNERS. They have us! They control us! They are our masters! Wake up! They’re all about you, all around you!


View user's profile Send private message

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:05 am Reply with quote  
Message
  DannikJerriko
EUC Staff
EUC Staff

Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 1204
Location: Nirn

Salaris Vorn wrote:
Reepicheep wrote:
BBC made a Top 100 Novels list:

6 The Bible


Are we talking the Bible as in the founding text of Christianity? Or is there another book going by that name (it would not surprise me if a group like Monty Python wrote a book and then jokingly called it "The Bible")?


Well, the Bible is just a book (to some people, to others it has more significant value), so I'm assuming it's the Bible.
_________________
There's always a bigger fish - Qui Gon Jinn.

You shall learn that history is an intricate weaving of many events. No one thing can be understood without the proper context.

The best techniques are passed on by the survivors.


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:53 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Caedus_16
Master
Master

Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 4699
Location: Korriban

Dog-Poop_Walker wrote:
Caedus_16 wrote:
First of all..."Moby ****" is just hilarious to me. Not the novel, but that particular way of listing it. Just baha.


lol I immediately noticed that too.

That should be called the 100 most overrated books of all time. But seriously, the Davinci Code? The book isn't awful so much as it's just fluffy book of the week material that doesn't shine in anyway other than the controversy of it's subject matter for those who are ignorant to the fact that it's a ripped off idea that was nothing new the first time a major book was written about it. To be on the same list as the bible and the works of Shakespeare is insulting.

C16: May I ask why you picked the Plague out of Camus' catalogue?


I'm a sucker for anything that discusses humanity, the human condition, and destiny.

@Reep: I chose the Divine Comedy because it is perhaps the most pure and open metaphor for the human condition, behavior, and visual imagery. Very few works since have been able to capture a feel with such a display or sense of feeling.
_________________
Perfection is a lifelong pursuit requiring sacrifice. The only way to get it quicker is to sacrifice the most.


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 9:31 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Salaris Vorn
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 2118
Location: New York, USA

DannikJerriko wrote:
Salaris Vorn wrote:
Reepicheep wrote:
BBC made a Top 100 Novels list:

6 The Bible


Are we talking the Bible as in the founding text of Christianity? Or is there another book going by that name (it would not surprise me if a group like Monty Python wrote a book and then jokingly called it "The Bible")?


Well, the Bible is just a book (to some people, to others it has more significant value), so I'm assuming it's the Bible.


True enough. I guess I'm just a bit surprised that they put it in the category of novel (or roughly speaking a type of text that should not be used as a basis of any factual information due to its fictional nature). As you noted to some people it has signfiicant value so I would have expected sensativity to that and not classify it as a novel (at least it's my assumption since Reep said it comes from the BBC list of top 100 novels).
_________________


View user's profile Send private message

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 9:51 am Reply with quote  
Message
  VileZero
Master
Master

Joined: 21 Mar 2010
Posts: 816
Location: Maryland

Salaris Vorn wrote:
DannikJerriko wrote:
Salaris Vorn wrote:
Reepicheep wrote:
BBC made a Top 100 Novels list:

6 The Bible


Are we talking the Bible as in the founding text of Christianity? Or is there another book going by that name (it would not surprise me if a group like Monty Python wrote a book and then jokingly called it "The Bible")?


Well, the Bible is just a book (to some people, to others it has more significant value), so I'm assuming it's the Bible.


True enough. I guess I'm just a bit surprised that they put it in the category of novel (or roughly speaking a type of text that should not be used as a basis of any factual information due to its fictional nature). As you noted to some people it has signfiicant value so I would have expected sensativity to that and not classify it as a novel (at least it's my assumption since Reep said it comes from the BBC list of top 100 novels).


"Novel" is used interchangeably for "book." There are non-fiction novels, after all.


View user's profile Send private message

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:00 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Reepicheep
Master
Master

Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 6506
Location: Sailing into the unknown

We should have a reading club for these books. Razz

DannikJerriko wrote:
For some reason the end of Animal Farm
Click here to see the hidden message (It might contain spoilers)
genuinely scared me.

I know what you mean! It's hard to put my finger on why it scares me, but... *shudder*

Salaris Vorn wrote:
Are we talking the Bible as in the founding text of Christianity?

I'm pretty sure its referring to the Bible. Maybe "Top 100 Novels" is a little misleading, though like VZ said, "book" and "novel" can be interchangeable.

Caedus_16 wrote:
@Reep: I chose the Divine Comedy because it is perhaps the most pure and open metaphor for the human condition, behavior, and visual imagery. Very few works since have been able to capture a feel with such a display or sense of feeling.

Cool.
_________________

Where sky and water meet,
Where the waves grow sweet,
Doubt not, Reepicheep,
To find all you seek,
There is the utter east.


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:03 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Caedus_16
Master
Master

Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 4699
Location: Korriban

VileZero wrote:
Salaris Vorn wrote:
DannikJerriko wrote:
Salaris Vorn wrote:
Reepicheep wrote:
BBC made a Top 100 Novels list:

6 The Bible


Are we talking the Bible as in the founding text of Christianity? Or is there another book going by that name (it would not surprise me if a group like Monty Python wrote a book and then jokingly called it "The Bible")?


Well, the Bible is just a book (to some people, to others it has more significant value), so I'm assuming it's the Bible.


True enough. I guess I'm just a bit surprised that they put it in the category of novel (or roughly speaking a type of text that should not be used as a basis of any factual information due to its fictional nature). As you noted to some people it has signfiicant value so I would have expected sensativity to that and not classify it as a novel (at least it's my assumption since Reep said it comes from the BBC list of top 100 novels).


"Novel" is used interchangeably for "book." There are non-fiction novels, after all.


I got lucky enough to take a class called "Biblical Literature" which examined the Bible as a book of short stories and history instead of a religious icon (work of lit instead of diving inspiration) and it was a very interesting class. At the urging of my professor I've also purchased the Quran for its poetry and the Bhagavad Gita for its metaphysical senses. I'm starting to really get into the study of religious literature, which brings me back to the Divine Comedy since its perhaps the most pure of them.
_________________
Perfection is a lifelong pursuit requiring sacrifice. The only way to get it quicker is to sacrifice the most.


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:10 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Reepicheep
Master
Master

Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 6506
Location: Sailing into the unknown

Caedus_16 wrote:
I got lucky enough to take a class called "Biblical Literature" which examined the Bible as a book of short stories and history instead of a religious icon (work of lit instead of diving inspiration) and it was a very interesting class.

That's interesting, because my definition of "God's Word" combines both aspects. I don't think any (maybe some) of the authors thought their books would one day make up a book called the Bible. However, I certainly don't reject the idea of the Bible being a work of divine craftsmanship. I just think God selected and preserved these books for His purposes. I don't necessarily think God dictated these books word for word (because of self-righteous attitudes in the Psalms, slight discrepencies in the Gospel, personal notes in the Epistles etc.), but I accept them as God's way of communicating with us, I think God is happy with His work, that it reflects His character accurately, and it's the book that I base my life around.
_________________

Where sky and water meet,
Where the waves grow sweet,
Doubt not, Reepicheep,
To find all you seek,
There is the utter east.


Last edited by Reepicheep on Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:12 am; edited 1 time in total


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:12 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Caedus_16
Master
Master

Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 4699
Location: Korriban

Reepicheep wrote:
Caedus_16 wrote:
I got lucky enough to take a class called "Biblical Literature" which examined the Bible as a book of short stories and history instead of a religious icon (work of lit instead of diving inspiration) and it was a very interesting class.

That's interesting, because my definition of "God's Word" combines both aspects. I don't think any (maybe some) of the authors thought their books would one day make up a book called the Bible. However, I certainly don't reject the idea of the Bible being a work of divine craftsmanship. I just think God selected and preserved these books for His purposes. I don't necessarily think God dictated these books word for word (because of self-righteous attitudes in the Psalms, slight discrepencies in the Gospel, personal notes in the Epistles etc.), but I accept them as God's way of communicating with us and it's the book that I base my life around.


As a collection of stories with morals it (for the most part) promotes a fairly healthy lifestyle. The basic principles are descriptive of being decent to everyone around you regardless of who they are or what they've done and with that as an underlying theme I can recommend it to people as almost a self-help book.
_________________
Perfection is a lifelong pursuit requiring sacrifice. The only way to get it quicker is to sacrifice the most.


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:23 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Reepicheep
Master
Master

Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 6506
Location: Sailing into the unknown

Caedus_16 wrote:
The basic principles are descriptive of being decent to everyone around you regardless of who they are or what they've done and with that as an underlying theme I can recommend it to people as almost a self-help book.

That's funny, because one of my favourite speakers at my church said that he often cites ideas from the Bible to people as advice without saying it's from the Bible. Then they'll say, "That's really good advice. Where did you get it from?", and then of course he tells them. Of course, as a Christian, I view the Bible as far more than a self help book, but it's cool how you can bring ideas from it into regular conversations without having to say where the idea is from and having people immediately turn their noses up at it.

I think the idea of genre is always important to keep in mind when reading the Bible.

C. S. Lewis was a literary scholar who loved mythology and said that the Gospels are one of two things: a) historical records or b) a style of literature that wouldn't come into fashion for hundreds of years. There's also plenty of historical evidence to back them up.

However, when you look at a book like Judges, it's just a different kind of writing. They read much more like mythology than the Gospels do.

The Psalms again are a collection of songs. They're not meant to be works of theology and are full of metaphors and literary devices.

The records of the kings of Israel are like records of other ancient kings, and (barring some possible exaggeration) are likely historically accurate.
_________________

Where sky and water meet,
Where the waves grow sweet,
Doubt not, Reepicheep,
To find all you seek,
There is the utter east.


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:30 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Caedus_16
Master
Master

Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 4699
Location: Korriban

Ya I've wondered at the exaggeration. My favorite passages come from the poetry because I'm a sucker for that self-indulgent, hopeless romantic nonsense but I think the best parts would be the gospels simply because they're the mark of a new type of story in the book. Fire and brimstone are gone in favor of love and compassion and its a very meaningful moment.
_________________
Perfection is a lifelong pursuit requiring sacrifice. The only way to get it quicker is to sacrifice the most.


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:32 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Reepicheep
Master
Master

Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 6506
Location: Sailing into the unknown

I love Isaiah. It has a very good balance of God's judgment (fire and brimstone) and God's mercy ("I have your name written on My hand). Also the Messiah foreshadowings are really cool.
_________________

Where sky and water meet,
Where the waves grow sweet,
Doubt not, Reepicheep,
To find all you seek,
There is the utter east.


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

 PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:25 pm Reply with quote  
Message
  Salaris Vorn
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 2118
Location: New York, USA

VileZero wrote:

"Novel" is used interchangeably for "book." There are non-fiction novels, after all.


I was unaware of that. I'd honestly never heard the word "novel" used to refer to anything other than works of fiction.
_________________


View user's profile Send private message

 PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:18 am Reply with quote  
Message
  Life Is The Path
Master
Master

Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 3736
Location: In a galaxy far, far - No, I'm behind you! Got you! Boo!

Click here to see the hidden message (It might contain spoilers)


I'm really not a fan of Jane Austen, so right now I can safely say I'll never read all of them Razz . But there are a fair few books that I've been meaning to read (and others I'm indifferent to). But I would have liked to see some more Douglas Adams on there - I recall hearing great things about his book Last Chance To See - and some Jules Verne, Mark Twain (most definitely), Jonathon Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Robert Lewis Stevenson, Edgar Allen Poe.
_________________
I am a Star Wars fan. That doesn't mean that I hate or love Jar Jar. That doesn't mean I hate or love Lucas, or agree or disagree 100% with him. That doesn't mean I prefer the PT over the OT, or vice versa. That doesn't mean I hate the EU, or even love all of it. These are not prerequisites. Being a man is not a prerequisite. Being a geek is not a prerequisite. The only prerequisite is that I love something about Star Wars. I am a Star Wars fan.

Life is like the Force - Luke Skywalker, Crucible. Damn straight I am.


View user's profile Send private message

 PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:44 pm Reply with quote  
Message
  Darth Skuldren
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 6242
Location: Missouri

Of that BBC list, I've read these...
Quote:
2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
4 The Harry Potter Series – JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6 The Bible
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
70 Moby **** – Herman Melville
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett


Moby D1ck was the worst of them. Why that is considered a classic is unknown to me. The book is a poor mish-mash of history, narration, and story.
_________________

"I believe toys resonate with us as humans, we can hold them them, it's tactile, real! They are totems for our extended beliefs and imaginations. A fetish for ideas that hold as much interest and passion as old religious relics for some. We display them in our homes. They show who we are. They are signals for similar thinking people. A way we connect with each other...and I guess thats why I do toys. That connection." -Ashley Wood


View user's profile Send private message

Post new topic   Reply to topic    The EUCantina Forums Forum Index » The Mos Eisley Cantina

Page 3 of 4
All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Display posts from previous:

  

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group
Jedi Knights 2 by Scott Stubblefield