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The English Language
 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:15 am Reply with quote  
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  Mara Jade Skywalker
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I was just thinking about this topic today, and I thought it might be fun as a thread. We all know those people (including ourselves), that can't pronounce a word right to save their lives, or use the wrong word/phrase entirely. For example, I had a friend that was notorious for using the wrong word in a phrase. For instance:

1. She would call "bids", not "dibs".

2. Referring to a person with multiple ethnicities (like most Americans), she would say "French Dressing", rather than "Heinz 57".

3. When she was excited about something, she would be "hung-go", instead of "gung-ho".

Etc. That was many years ago, but my family still uses many of these in jest.

These days, my best friend pronounces many things incorrectly, despite my attempts to correct him. I've given up, and just let him have at it. Examples:

1. Expoentially (he leaves out the first 'n', which almost seems like it would be harder to say)

2. Supposebly (I know this one is common)

And this is not a pronunciation, but he always says he "could care less". And for someone as literally critical as he is, this drives me crazy. Like I am not allowed to say I haven't done something "in forever", because he'll say, "Oh, so you've never done it?" Arg.

So anyway, I find it fun to learn how people say things. The English language has so many nuances and such, it's just amusing how many differences people can come up with.
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:15 am Reply with quote  
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  Taral-DLOS
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For the record, I have honestly never heard either the terms "French dressing" or "Heinz-57" in relation to multi-ethnic people. Is this an American-ism?

I've always enjoyed looking at different regional terms. I was visiting South Carolina for a conference last spring, and when I went to a fast-food joint, I asked that my drink be "pop". He noticed, because apparently you guys have other words for it? Soda?

Anyways, probably my first experience with weird regional differences in terminology.

My father also says "could care less", and every time he says it I shudder.
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:28 am Reply with quote  
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  Mara Jade Skywalker
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French dressing isn't a term, other than what it actually is: French dressing that you would put on your salad. But Heinz 57 (also a sauce of sorts), is used to describe multi-ethnic people. I suppose because they're made up of many ethnicities, like the sauce is made up of 57 ingredients (hence the 57 in the title). It's not a term you hear often, but that's what it means.

Correct, we don't say pop. We know what it is, but that's not what we call it. We also don't call it soda, and unlike the very popular opinion, we do not call everything Coke. I know some places do, but no one I know in this region does that. You only call it Coke if you actually want a Coke. Most commonly, we call it a soft drink, or we simply name the exact drink we would like. "I would like a root beer." Or, "Does anyone want a soft drink?"
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:37 pm Reply with quote  
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  Salaris Vorn
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Mara Jade Skywalker wrote:
French dressing isn't a term, other than what it actually is: French dressing that you would put on your salad. But Heinz 57 (also a sauce of sorts), is used to describe multi-ethnic people. I suppose because they're made up of many ethnicities, like the sauce is made up of 57 ingredients (hence the 57 in the title). It's not a term you hear often, but that's what it means.


I've never actually heard the Heinz one in reference to races. Interestingly up north anyway I think 57 is taken to mean 57 Heinz product varieties rather 57 different ingredients. I think we just say "mixed race," if we bother to specify someone is multi-ethnic. Usually only applied in a case such as Derek Jeter who has a white parent and black parent; mostly I think discussions are "so what ethnicities are you?" which leads to listing "well I've got a little British, French, Irish/Scottish/etc., German so on and so forth." (Probably because the northeast is filled with port cities where immigrants entered the country so it's more rare to hear someone identify as just one ethnicity than hear them identify with several).

Quote:
Correct, we don't say pop. We know what it is, but that's not what we call it. We also don't call it soda, and unlike the very popular opinion, we do not call everything Coke. I know some places do, but no one I know in this region does that. You only call it Coke if you actually want a Coke. Most commonly, we call it a soft drink, or we simply name the exact drink we would like. "I would like a root beer." Or, "Does anyone want a soft drink?"


Up north you normally ask for a soda (or just specify the exact drink you want like Coke or Sprite). The only times I've seen soda listed on a menu as pop (instead of soda or soft drink) is when it's at a themed place (such as a steakhouse that's going with a southern/mid-west theme). Like you we don't call soda "Coke."

As for my area I know I usually pronounce battle and bottle wrong by not pronouncing the ts clearly (usually dropping the second t). So it sounds something like bot-ul or bat-ul. Interestingly it appears that this is similar to the New York accent my grandfather (who died before I was born) spoke with much to the chagrin of my grandmother who made sure my father didn't speak with that accent (so I have no idea how I picked it up). Apparently I also have a regional accent in how I pronounce "elementary" which is pronounced somewhere between "elementree" and "elementarry" although I've been told my accent is not too pronounced.

EDIT: correction on "elementary" pronunciation
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Last edited by Salaris Vorn on Tue Oct 28, 2014 1:11 pm; edited 2 times in total


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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:55 pm Reply with quote  
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  Mara Jade Skywalker
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I don't know that one would consider Urban Dictionary to be an authoritative source, but here you go:

Heinz 57

We actually say elementree, as well. Down here, everything gets slurred into as short a combination as possible. Maybe we are just lazy, I don't know. Wink
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 1:01 pm Reply with quote  
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  Salaris Vorn
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Mara Jade Skywalker wrote:
I don't know that one would consider Urban Dictionary to be an authoritative source, but here you go:

Heinz 57


Huh, learn something new every day.

Quote:
We actually say elementree, as well. Down here, everything gets slurred into as short a combination as possible. Maybe we are just lazy, I don't know. Wink


I've been told my accent is not too pronounced so it probably is a weird hybridization of "tarry" and "tree" (I actually spent several minutes sitting here pronouncing elementary trying to better refine how I pronounce it, which just made my brain become very confused after listening to the "proper" pronunciation on Webster's online dictionary and trying to compare it to how I would pronounce it). The best I can figure is my accent would make it come out something like "elementaree"

EDIT: Oh blast hit the "Edit" button instead of the "quote" button. Sorry Mara for screwing up your post (I tried to undo as much as I could but I think I accidentally deleted some things)!
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 1:14 pm Reply with quote  
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  Mara Jade Skywalker
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Haha, no worries! I think it's just missing the part where I said that I can imagine the accent you're referring to with battle and bottle. We slur that as well, though. So maybe it's similar!

I have been told that I mumble, and I suppose it doesn't help that our dialect around here compresses everything together. Such as the notorious "Where y'at?", which would be short for, "Hey, where are you?". I do not know whether the compression is an American thing, or a New Orleans thing, but it's just all mushy. I guess I can understand why I am sometimes hard to understand. Sad
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 PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:15 pm Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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English: Mother******, Do you speak it?

Sorry. I couldn't resist. Anyway, only people from Texish call soft drinks "Coke".

There is a common phrase that goes two ways that people always say I say wrong, but I can't remember what it is.

It's something like "all the time" or nevertheless" where you can take or leave out "the". Obviously you can't in those examples, but it makes sense with whatever I'm thinking of.
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 4:40 am Reply with quote  
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  Life Is The Path
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I'm not entirely sure, but I think people from Detroit say 'pop' rather than soda, or what have you.

Personally, I'm not a great speaker, so I tend to mumble and stumble over all my words, so ... anyway. However! I do have a tendency to pronounce 'colonel' coll-o-nell' and 'quay' 'kway' and so on. Most notably when I read them. I think it's because I learned the pronunciation and the spelling at two separate times and so never fully connected the two in my mind.

I do remember, once in Glasgow, I was talking to a Glaswegian, and I was saying how I was going to Edinburgh. 'Ye what?' he said, looking at me dumbly. Now, my mother's from Glasgow, and when talking to Scots I tend to slip into a Glaswegian accent. In this instance, I had feared that my second-hand accent had let me down. 'Edd-in-brach,' I said in an exaggerated fashion. 'Dun-eh-d'n.' I added. Glasgow has a very small population of Gaelic speakers (about 10%), so I thought it would help. It didn't. But after a while he realised where I meant and exclaimed 'Oh! You mean S***hole!' I laughed duly, remembering that Glasgow and Edinburgh natives don't like each other (though personally I love both). Later, I told him I was on my way to Inverness. 'Ye mean S***hole-That-Way?' he said, very helpfully providing directions in the name and a vague hand-wave to the north. Very imaginative place-naming system, the Scots have.
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:53 am Reply with quote  
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  YodaBauer2442
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Yeah, "pop" and "soda" are both used all across the US but different areas tend to like one or the other. I use them interchangeable at times. Though more often than not I say "pop". Then there are pops that are called sodas. Like grape soda, orange soda, cream soda. I don't know. They mean the same thing. Calling pop in general "Coke" I think is in different pockets of the south.
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 2:39 pm Reply with quote  
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I think "pop" is more of a Midwestern thing. It's definitely what we call it in Minnesota, and I think Chicago does too.
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 3:14 pm Reply with quote  
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  YodaBauer2442
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I'm from Michigan, so that would make sense.
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 3:21 pm Reply with quote  
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  Reepicheep
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Here's a handy map, not sure how accurate it is though:



"Could care less" and other such errors make my skin crawl lol.

I have a pet peeve, but I'm not 100% sure its justified. It's when someone says "your guys's" - as in "What is your guys's opinion on that?" Ugh... I hate it. It is grammatically incorrect, though, right?
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 PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:36 pm Reply with quote  
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  Mara Jade Skywalker
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Nice map, but it isn't accurate for this region. We're completely red for "Coke", and one random blue spot for "Pop"! The horror.

I hate that expression, too, Reep. Except I'm not any better. Because we say y'all's. Hee-hee. Wink
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 PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:49 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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Reepicheep wrote:


I have a pet peeve, but I'm not 100% sure its justified. It's when someone says "your guys's" - as in "What is your guys's opinion on that?" Ugh... I hate it. It is grammatically incorrect, though, right?


Technically it's correct, or rather it does not violate grammar rules so could be considered correct.... but the statement is not.

Since the person is addressing multiple guys, he needs to seek their plural opinions, not their singular opinion. Unless he isn't. I suppose the group could be singular or plural.

It should be "what is your guys's opinion?" which is awkward. Better to be "what are your guys's opinions?"

I personally don't use an extra s for a possessive plural, but put the apostrophe after the s, as in guys', which is also acceptable. and generally preferred in written form.
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