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 PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:08 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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You didn't like Dumbkirk? I thought it was great. After I woke up at the end of the movie, I had enjoyed a really nice nap.

oh, I forgot to mention the best part of Rough Night was us making fun of scarlett yohansson. At the start of the movie there is a flash back she's supposed to be a college freshman. I said, "Why is Hillary Clinton at this frat party?" My friend said, "Oh no. This 80 year old woman must have gotten confused and wandered away from her nursing home."

Saw Spiderman:MCU. I had low expectations, I didn't like his part in Civil War, but I actually liked it a lot. I thought the idea of a teenage Spiderman was dumb, but it was actually a smart way to do a formulaic superhero movie with a different narrative, and it provided some themes to that that I didn't see coming. That was the best thing about the movie.

I thought it was really bizarre that Michael Keaton was playing Bird Man for real, but he did a good job. They give him some atypical super villain motivations, while not deep, it was welcome and made a nice dynamic with Spiderman.

There's a scene were Zendaya makes a "political" statement that is really out of tone with the movie and that confused me. Then I realized that it was a character moment for her, and I didn't quiet get that because she didn't really have any other ones. It would have worked better if it was an exchange between her and other students in the conversation.

My friend loves Anton Yelchin and Spiderboy looks and acts just like him, so the movie was kind of emotionally difficult for them. Maybe that is a too personal thing to share, but maybe you feel the same.

The movie doesn't really have anything to do with the MCU and it feels very forced to cram in all these connections and I didn't like that. RDJ is obnoxious as usual. he gives this stupid speech "if you are nothing without the ]spider] suit, then you don't deserve it." ugh, what? he was already a superhero, that was why you recruited him and ya know he actually has superpowers unlike Iron Man who is nothing without his suit.

Loved Martin Starr. The Comedian cameos were a bit too much though and it was distracting. The only thing I really didn't like was Donglover at all, and doing what my friend called "a vocal black face", using an affected "thug" way of speaking.
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 PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:19 am Reply with quote  
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  Reepicheep
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Guys, I was so disappointed with Dunkirk! Sad

I'm a Nolan fanboy, so I had high expectations for this, but I left the theatre confused and let down. I need characters to latch onto. That's one of the most fundamental rules of story-telling for me. Get me to care about the characters and I'm onboard.

I was just really out of sympathy with what Nolan was trying to do in this movie. Without real characters to get invested in, I just didn't care about what was happening on screen. It was a very well shot, pretty movie, but I was just watching events happen disinterestedly. It never pulled me in.

That and the idea of an entire movie being a slow, drawn-out action scene also didn't appeal to me. I needed time to breathe. I usually love Hans Zimmer, but I found the score really irritating. Just repetitive ticking and buzzing. It was like trying to watch a movie while someone's using a leafblower right outside the window.

It was also so simple for Nolan. I'm used to his movies dealing with big ideas and having thought-provoking dialogue, but this was just a simple survival story. Right now the non-linear story-telling is the only reason I have for re-watching it. I hope I'm missing something and that I will enjoy it more the second time, but for right now... I don't get it.
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 PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 10:11 pm Reply with quote  
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  Caedus_16
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I kinda dig Dunkirk actually. I like the triptych style of storytelling, I like the fact that we didn't waste words (a big Nolan criticism is his excessive exposition...looking at you, JGL in Inception). I like the fact that we didn't waste time on character backstories. The pacing was breakneck and it's such a short film for him so I didn't mind that. The score was awesome (Zimmer knocks it out of the park here).

It isn't a genius film but I think it's far and away the most interesting war film I've seen in quite a while. I was genuinely surprised, particularly after seeing some of the frustration with it here.

I would have liked another 20 minutes or so to extend The Mole plot, as that was supposed to be a week and it needed to feel longer than the other plots. That's my main issue, but other than that I enjoyed it quite a bit.
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 PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 3:45 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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I think that Nolan is capable of making a film like Paths Of Glory, but I guess no one would watch it. Or rather, pay for it. I heard that he wanted to make a silent film.

That's why the first act of War of the Apes was one of the best movies made this year. Movie studios heard the adage that "film is a visual median" and thought that meant you should spend 200 million dollars on special effects and just have the story told to the audience through expository dialogue, because this is the nineteen thirties and films are just stage plays but with explosions!
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 PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 8:24 pm Reply with quote  
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  Caedus_16
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Oh lordy do I love the last two apes movies, particularly the nigh-on silent aspects of them. Those films are singlehandedly proving that you can make a blockbuster that focuses on the personal story and not just special effects, and Nolan is right up there as well. I can only hope that this kind of thing spurs people on to bigger and better in that aspect.

I kind of wish they'd let Nolan make it a silent film but I think the dialogue worked out the way he wanted it and I think it really did bring a lot of conversation. One complaint I hear a lot about his films is that the dialogue is hard to hear (it's not a problem I've ever had, I don't understand it but it is a common one). I think that kind of adds to what he was going for here as some of it was more difficult to follow in small moments but overall it worked effectively.
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 PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 10:22 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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I'm glad that you got what I was talking about. It might've been confusing to praise a movie entirely made of special effects and then immediately transition into a blast against special effects. Of course, special effects was not what I was really discussing at all, but about visual storytelling method.

I like the idea of hard to hear dialogue in a war movie, there are other things you could do too... but there is no point. I think that this is the real problem with Dunkirk. The audience is fatigued. There isn't anything left to say. Steven Spielberg already made the perfect war movie, and even for better movies, they have been rendered unnecessary.

That might be a confusing statement and one could question why it doesn't apply to other genres... Sorry, I don't want to elaborate. That kind of segues into what I want to talk about.

A retro review of the classic? Black Swan. I think it might be Aronofsky's best made film, but I have big problems with it. The one I want to talk about is redundancy. It's fine to make a pastiche or homage film, that's Tarantino's entire career, but what I described as fatigue applied so much here. I was so bored and confused about why such specific ideas were translated into such an unoriginal film.

The oddest thing is that the film obviously deconstructs the mythos in Swan Lake, but hints at and then never develops the theme of meta commentary on voyeurism. Oddest because that is the main theme of Perfect Blue, the films primary source material. They made White Girl In The Shell, so I really don't know why they just didn't make that movie. If you take anything from this, it's that they should've just remade Perfect Blue.

It's kind of weird because that is symbolically represented in all of his movies, but never an overt theme.

There's the stalking and cult element of Pi. Television and gameshows in Requiem. The Wrestler, obviously. The meta novel framework of Fountain. The only film that doesn't have it is Noah.

That's because Aronofsky only wants to develop the theme of Qabalahist mythos, and everything else is only incidental. Most clearly in Noah. Also that movie just sucked.

Back on topic, Black Swan does have the most overt anti patriarchal theme of all of it's inspirations which I think is probably the only reason for it's success. But that brings up the main problem I have with the film, the spectacle of female sexuality and the male gaze on film...

Excuse me, I'm gonna go watch Suspiria now.
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Spread out all around us is a petrified world, a world of Things, where we ourselves, our gestures, and even our feelings figure in as Things. Nothing can belong to us as truly our own in such a landscape of death. Under commodity occupation the most concrete truth about everything is the truth of it's infinite replaceablity.


Last edited by Dog-Poop_Walker on Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:25 am; edited 1 time in total


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 PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2017 12:03 pm Reply with quote  
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  Reepicheep
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I almost wonder if I would have liked Dunkirk better if Nolan had gone all in and made it a true silent film. It might have changed my expectations a little bit.

I forgot to mention, did you guys notice the actor who plays Bala-Tik (i.e. the "Tell that to Kanjiklub" guy) in Dunkirk? I involuntarily snorted when he showed up because of the meme. Razz
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 PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:03 am Reply with quote  
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  Taral-DLOS
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Dog-Poop_Walker wrote:


Saw Spiderman:MCU. I had low expectations, I didn't like his part in Civil War, but I actually liked it a lot. I thought the idea of a teenage Spiderman was dumb, but it was actually a smart way to do a formulaic superhero movie with a different narrative, and it provided some themes to that that I didn't see coming. That was the best thing about the movie.


Spider-Man was always a teenager though. He was 15 in the comics, and he was supposed to be a teen in the Toby Maguire and Andrew Garfield films (they just made him a senior in both cases).

I loved Spider-Man: Homecoming. Best Spider-Man yet, and one of my favourite MCU movies so far (behind Winter Soldier, which remains the best).
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 PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:17 pm Reply with quote  
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  Reepicheep
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I saw War for the Planet of the Apes! I was worried about this one. I enjoyed the first one, and loved the second one, but after the conclusion of "Dawn" I was concerned that everything interesting had been said and that "War" would devolve into an action fest without any real substance (like The Matrix Revolutions). I couldn't have been more wrong! Great movie! The experience was the opposite of Dunkirk for me - I was gripped from beginning to end.

@Caedus: I read your article and I think it is well-written. I hadn't made the connection between Midian and Caesar's home in "Dawn". It actually makes a big difference because I had been thinking of the apes' flight to the woods at the end of "Rise" as the Exodus and so the Exodus in "War" kind of took me aback at first. I think the end of "Rise" was still influenced by the Exodus, but thinking of the woods as Midian instead of the Promised Land makes the difference between a trilogy that uses a bunch of Moses imagery to a trilogy that actually follows the Moses narrative. Interesting take on Koba as the Angel of Death too (as a side note, terrible as he is, Koba is my favourite character, so I loved that they brought him back for "War" without actually bringing him back from the dead).

The only possible criticism with the article I would have is the use of the word "deism". Deism is the belief in a god who creates the world and then lets it to run on its own without interference, as opposed to theism which is the belief in a more personal god who is actively involved in the world through miracles, prayer etc. If you're talking about the cultural shift away from the Judeo-Christian god to atheism/agnosticism, then theism would be a more accurate word.
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 PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 9:08 am Reply with quote  
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  Caedus_16
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@Reep: Did some reading, you're right. I've made the change from Deism to Theism, it makes much more sense this way.

Also, thanks for taking a look at it!
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 PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 6:25 pm Reply with quote  
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  Darth Skuldren
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Spider-Man: Homecoming = loved it. I'm always a fan of villains, and Michael Keaton was great. That one scene--no spoilers but you'll know the one--the suspense and awkwardness between Keaton and the guy playing Peter Parker...that was priceless. Very nice curve ball I thought. But overall the characterization of Vulture and the comedy of Spider-Man is what made the movie for me.

War For the Planet of the Apes = also really enjoyed this one. I like how they made Woody Harrelson's character to be Kurtz from Apocalypse Now and how they did something different with that whole storyline. It was the expected. I also like what they did with Caesar as it was also dodging the expected as his storyline traversed. And 'Bad Ape' was funny.

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Worlds = I really want to see this one again. It felt like it belonged in the same galaxy as The Fifth Element, which is fitting since it was inspired by the Valerian comics. The movie was surprising in that it started out not even focusing on the lead characters, but instead diving into the world and the aliens. There's over 200 alien species in this movie, and I'm a sucker for aliens. There's lots of great moments, and the story is enjoyable. The one flaw is that Dane DeHaan isn't the most charismatic lead. He comes off very much as a normal everyday person. In a way, it puts the character of Valerian in a different viewpoint. But it also hurts the entertainment value of the movie, too. I stilled give it a good 4/5.

Now on a side note - I love war movies. I'm a fan of the old war movies like Kelly's Heroes and The Dirty Dozen. I think there are still plenty of stories to tell. In particular, I'd love a movie on the Battle of Kursk, the largest tank battle there has ever been. And I'd like one on Operation Mercury, Germany's airborne invasion of the island of Crete. Both are very unique historic events that had major outcomes on the war. Germany depleted their tanks in one battle, and their paratroopers in another. They would both be visually breathtaking and serve a great historic value in bringing them to life for audiences as I don't know of any films that have covered either battle.
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 PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:41 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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I didn't like the Col. Kurtz allusion. That was so on the nose. All that stuff I said about Black Swan, it was called to mind by War of the Apes. What I liked the least is that it was basically Logan with monkeys. It was just too much. We just need one. I think War is the better of the two though, as the themes of the Other and Humanism, and the overall composition of the first 1/3 of the movie was very strong and better than the whole of Logan for me. The dialectic of Caesar and Koba was very good, as opposed to the flat ending of Logan that was just nihilistic with a, I guess, absurd hope? Kind of a failure.

I just noticed that Fight Club contains themes from like every Dostoevsky work. I'm sure that is intentional, since Notes From Underground is considered to have invented the Existentialist novel. But D. wrote a book called Demons about the moral bankruptcy of revolutionary terrorism in a group led by a charismatic sociopathic cult leader. Fight Club, going from a story about constructed masculinity to that exact and oddly specific scenario creates, at least for me now, a kind of jarring tonal shift.
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 PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 4:58 pm Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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My friends wanted to watch Friday The 13th, because none of us had ever seen the first movie. They hadn't seen any of them, I've seen like 3 out of the fifteen or whatever.

So my friend says, "Isn't Jamie Lee Curtis in this movie?"
Me: "No, that's Halloween."
Friend 1: "But the killer is the dude in the mask, right?"
Me: "Yeah."
Friend 1: "Michael Meyers."
Me.: "No, that's also Halloween."
Friend 2: "Jason is the killer. But in this one the killer is his mom."
Me: "spoiler alert dude! way to ruin the movie!"
Friend 2: "you already knew that. Everyone knows that."
Me: "Yeah, I did. I was just kidding"

After the movie:
Friend 2: "What the heck? Why would Drew Barrymore in Scream think that the killer was Jason and not his mom? She deserved to die! We don't even hear anything about Jason until the end of the movie."
Me: "yeah, Jason isn't really in this movie at all."
Friend 2: "No one who is watching this movie is going to think that Jason is the killer."
Friend 1: "I though that it was going to be Jason going around killing people, and then at the end of the movie he was going to take off his mask and reveal that it was actually his mom."
Friend 2: "Me too!"
Me: "That's what you thought? I knew that this movie didn't really have anything to do with him."
Friend 1: "Then why do people think the Friday The 13th movies are about Jason?"
Me: " I don't know. Because they made like 15 more movies and he's in those ones."

After watching Friday The 13th part 2.
Friend 1: "I thought Jason was a dude in a hockey mask. I feel I've been really misled about this series."

In case you didn't know, in the second movie he wears a sack over his head and not the mask. We also all agreed it didn't make any sense that Jason died in 1957, and then 35 years later in the first movie he was eight years old, but now he's an adult in the second one which takes place five years later.

Also, I thought it was weird that the first movie takes place in "present day", but it was made in 1980. And the sequel takes place "five years later" but it was made in 1981, so it technically takes place in the future. I always think that is interesting when movies do that.
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 PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:09 pm Reply with quote  
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  Queen Padmè Skywalker
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I saw Dunkirk a couple of weeks ago, as apparently many of you did. I appreciated what Nolan was trying to do and I think he succeeded in some aspects, but there was definitely a feeling of....I don't know, flatness to it.

Spider-Man: Homecoming was fantastic. The perfect light hearted vehicle for the character. Holland is surprisingly able to pull off a significant amount of depth, though. And praises be for not having to watch Uncle Ben die.

I also saw Detroit. It was a little more....scattered that I would have expected from Kathryn Bigelow, but I can see the point of it. Very good performances, though.
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 PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:45 am Reply with quote  
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  Dog-Poop_Walker
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What do Godard, Bergman, Kurosawa and Michael Bay have in common?

I just found out that Armageddon was on the Criterion Collection. Shocked Laughing
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